I live in a town with a major university and have found that students trash their textbooks at the end of the semester. They can be found in various conditions. The university requires you to scan your student ID card to resell texts- mostly to detect any unusual patterns, I guess. I sold most of the books through Half.com. If you keep an eye out, you can also buy your books online and resell them for a profit.
Lori chose eBay as her preferred platform, “Back in the nineties, I was actually a professional eBay seller of rare and out-of-print VHS tapes. I knew eBay well and I had a very high and 100% positive feedback rating. Had I made the switch to Amazon, for example, I would have been starting with no rating and no reputation. I did look into it, though, because creating and managing listings on Amazon is much easier than on eBay, where it's quite time-consuming. But when I examined the Amazon fee schedule, I discovered that their fees were much, much higher, at least if you're not a high-volume seller. Most used books are not worth very much money, and, in many cases, to be competitive on Amazon I would have had to reduce my profit margins to pennies. Maybe I could compensate for that by selling more volume with the time I would save, but then I'd be faced with the problem of storage – not to mention the hassle of locating an individual title once I did sell it.”
which scanner app do you use or recommend? how did you come up with that list of text books? that sounds like an interesting idea. i am selling books on Amazon now and have almost 2000 in my garage. with the fee increase plus 15% plus packing materials I will not get rich. However, the thought of labeling and mailing that many books to Amazon is daunting. do you make that many more sales going prime to justify the cost?
Without a decent description you’re unlikely to sell a book. As far as eBay goes, you should include an image of the book, its synopsis (the blurb on the back cover) and statements concerning the condition of the book. Highlight rips or tears, dog ears (those top-corner bends to mark a page in the absence of a bookmark), and scrawlings or other markings, loose or broken bindings, any creases in the bindings, and creases on the front or back of a paperback book.

There is a lot of opportunity in the FBA program and I have had great results selling new toys through it. You can find toys all over that are on sale or clearance that sell for 300% more or greater on amazon. It is still hard to beat the margins in books but toys and other retail items can be ‘easier’ to acquire with good margins. (they do require more capital)
Thanks for the information.I’m selling books part-time on Amazon.When it comes to sourcing book it really needs some effort and time.I source books which have a good sales rank and sales history for that I have to understand the Keepa graph which is really difficult but last month I found a free statistical search engine for books http://www.amstick.com . It easy to understand and saves a lot of time.Hope this will help books sellers like me.
I’ve been around the block more than once, and I’ve worked successfully offline for many years. Working online is a new experience for me. Scams are everywhere, especially in a bad economy. Sales & marketing is the same concept of persuading people online as it is offline, but with added technology and new avenues unknown to newbies. That stumps a lot of people. The ZNZ instructions of having to fill out offers using your credit card was vaguely explained. They said you need a credit card to verify it’s really you. Meanwhile, your common sense is telling you to watch out, because we know our credit card will be charged eventually for something!

Ebooks are, well, books. But in a format where they can be delivered or downloaded online. You can write them yourself, employ writers, use public domain content, and create your ebooks from many sources. And just about any subject can be covered — just as many, if not more, than what a traditional publisher might release because you can tailor your tomes to niche markets. Travel guides, how-to manuals, mystery, romance, science fiction, self-help, technology, religions… just about any subject is fair game as long as there is a market of ready buyers.


2) If you sell via FBA, you’ll have the FBA fee, which is more or less shipping/handling on Amazon’s part. This usually starts at about $3.02 for the first pound and goes up about $0.75 for each pound after (you can use Amazon’s FBA calculator to predict this cost in advance). If you do FBM, then they’ll tack on an additional $3.99 for shipping, which USUALLY covers most media mail shipping costs for books unless it’s a particular heavy book.
I’m new to the Amazon selling game. After some research I found buying and reselling textbooks an idea people agree on. However I also read (mostly on Amazon own seller central blog) that several books and textbooks in particular are increasingly becoming restricted items for small (and not so small) sellers, a policy that started about a year ago. Looks like it’s still possible to sell some, but restriction is increasing on the most demanded ones.

The price point is partly a result of the market’s downward pressure: at a certain level of supply and demand the race to the lowest price swiftly plummets to the bottom. What remains inflexible is the $3.99 fee Amazon charges the buyer for shipping. From that $4, Amazon takes what they call a “variable closing fee” of $1.35. They also charge the seller 15% of the item’s price – which in the case of a penny book is zero. That leaves $2.64 to cover postage, acquisition cost and overhead.


Books are heavy items. Most buyers will expect to have their books delivered to them and you need to consider shipping and postage costs when you price your wares. Some websites have standard postal charge (e.g. Amazon). This may not cover the actual shipping costs. So make sure the book sale price is sufficient to cover your outgoings and make a profit for you. Some websites (e.g. eBay) allow you to determine what (if anything) you want to charge for shipping on top of the sale price. You may also be able to specify different costs for tracked delivery compared to standard delivery.
Here, enter the relevant details concerning the book’s condition, how much you wish to sell it for and which postage options you wish to use. Note that Amazon offers a fulfilment service for delivery of your goods, but this is really only an option for professional sellers. Your best option is to offer the fastest and most affordable shipping, although bear in mind the trade-off between these two qualities.
Repurposing or upcycling. Transforming unwanted books, CDs and records into decorative or useful items is considered by some to be sacrilege, a perversion of the item's original intent. But particularly if you have damaged items in your collection, there are countless creative ways to upcycle or repurpose them into some pretty cool stuff. A quick search on Pinterest.com will reveal a trove of project ideas for unwanted books — from hollowing out a book to create a secret storage safe for valuables to using pages as wallpaper or to make a lampshade. Old CDs can be used as conversation-starter drink coasters or made into a playful wind chime. And you can even find instructions online for heating and shaping a vinyl record to make a retro-looking decorative bowl.
Just because you are self-publishing doesn’t mean you want it to like an amateur did it. Hire a graphic designer on a site like Fiverr.com to create a good-looking cover based on your direction and input for not much money. They can also lay out the interior pages too. Just because your book is self-published doesn't mean it has to look and feel that way.
The description of your book should include the date of publication, title and author, as well as the illustrator (if relevant). If it is a modern book it will also have an ISBN number which is a unique identifier relating to the publishing format and date of publication. If there is anything unique about the book, for example it is signed by the author then this should also be included in the description.
I am about to retire, and I have about 6 thousand books in my personal library. Many of these are professional books: religious topics, Bible commentaries, and so on. I had thought to sell a lot of these on Amazon, but I really can’t understand how people can make a profit for those book that are listed at one cent, or four or five dollars. As I have looked up some of my books, I find that some of them might go for 10=15 dollars, so that might be worth it. But I figured I would do the fulfillment myself. What I have are books likely to be found by people looking for that specific title or topic. I have bought many books through Amazon for a penny, with the $3.99 shipping added. Is that enough to turn a profit?
To make this type of business pay you need specialist knowledge. This could be knowing which editions are collectable, or having useful contacts in the antique or vintage trade. Getting the right books to sell and matching them to waiting customers is the key to success. You may find that this "homebased" business actually involves a lot of travel outside the home (to auction sales and the like).
Half.com. An eBay-affiliated site specializing in books and CDs, Half.com doesn't require you to pay a listing fee, but you do pay a commission out of your proceeds when you sell an item. Commissions range from 5 to 15 percent, depending on the sale amount: The higher the sale price is, the lower the commission rate is. Half.com will make payments via direct deposit into your checking account.
In 2000, I inherited about 200 books from my mother, who was a city librarian for 37 years and who salvaged these books when the library culled its collection to make room for new books. These books are up to 150 years old and were selected by her for their literary value. Many of them have signatures on the inner cover. Many are in excellent condition. Others are in poor shape. We want to get rid of the books and want to use Amazon FBA. Some of these books may be valuable because of their content and the historical era in which they were published.
Perspectives can change indeed. I hope they do but I doubt that they will. For the past 45 years I kept almost every issue of every magazine I've subscribed to and every book that I bought with the idea that, at some point, I will re-read them. Well, I haven't. There always were new magazine issues and new books to read. Once they were moved to the attic, it was "out of sight, out of mind." Then I came to the realization that no matter how much I enjoyed reading them and how informative they were, these books and magazines are outdated.
Christian Cawley is a Deputy Editor at MakeUseOf, covering security, Linux, DIY and programming, with extensive experience in desktop and software support. Christian is a regular contributor to Linux User & Developer magazine, as well as specials including Raspberry Pi for Beginners, and Raspberry Pi for Kids. He's a Raspberry Pi tinkerer, Android user, podcaster and foodie.
Most of you may already know how to check completed listings on eBay; however, if not, its pretty simple.  There is an option on the left sidebar that says “Completed Listing”.  Simply check this box, and then only the listings for the particular search topic you have entered that are completed will show.  By doing this kind of research, you can find out pretty quickly how much you can expect to sell a book for.
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