Christian Cawley is a Deputy Editor at MakeUseOf, covering security, Linux, DIY and programming, with extensive experience in desktop and software support. Christian is a regular contributor to Linux User & Developer magazine, as well as specials including Raspberry Pi for Beginners, and Raspberry Pi for Kids. He's a Raspberry Pi tinkerer, Android user, podcaster and foodie.
If you decide you want to sell your used book, just click on the sell button next to the vendor and you’re all set.  You will be emailed a shipping label and then all you have to do is ship the book within 7 days.  Oh btw, shipping is free.  Normally if you were to ship book with USPS, it would cost around $5-6 dollars.  That would make no sense at all if the book’s value is only a few bucks.  But with BookScouter, shipping is free so that’s one less thing to worry about.
which scanner app do you use or recommend? how did you come up with that list of text books? that sounds like an interesting idea. i am selling books on Amazon now and have almost 2000 in my garage. with the fee increase plus 15% plus packing materials I will not get rich. However, the thought of labeling and mailing that many books to Amazon is daunting. do you make that many more sales going prime to justify the cost?
When I was doing FBM, I was spending about 3-4 hours per night. Once I switch to FBA that went down to 3-4 hours per week, most of which was spending time finding deals on wholesale books and listing the books on Amazon. I was working full time for most of that time, so I could only do so much with the book selling, but still made about $1000/month profit doing it as a side hustle. When I switched to OA, it got a lot easier, as I just created a list of “hot finds” and would look around for deals on those. It’s surprising how bad people are at pricing things on Ebay–of course, that’s a double edged sword, as they’re also terrible at getting the conditions right, so I end up spending a lot of time arguing over books with writing inside, stains, smells-like-smoke, etc.

You might also consider selling your textbooks on Half.com. Their fees are usually lower than Amazon’s and you also receive a small shipping credit. Selling on Half is a good option for books that other sites currently are not buying back or offering low rates. As with Amazon, you only get paid once somebody buys and you might find yourself in a pricing war if other college students list their books as well.
Christian Cawley is a Deputy Editor at MakeUseOf, covering security, Linux, DIY and programming, with extensive experience in desktop and software support. Christian is a regular contributor to Linux User & Developer magazine, as well as specials including Raspberry Pi for Beginners, and Raspberry Pi for Kids. He's a Raspberry Pi tinkerer, Android user, podcaster and foodie.
En español | In his book, The Library at Night, author Alberto Manguel writes: "Ultimately, the number of books always exceeds the space they are granted." If you're a lover and collector of books or music, you know the truth behind those words. If you're looking to free up some shelf space or maybe generate some extra cash, here are the best ways to part with unwanted books, CDs and records.
The first question I naturally had was "How the hell can they make any money selling books at £0.01? I can't even source books at that price!" The answer came soon enough, if you add one of these books to your cart, you'll quickly see that there's a £1-2 shipping charge, and you can't use Super Saver Delivery. The interesting thing about selling on Amazon is that Amazon themselves set the delivery charge pricing. So even if I wanted to charge 0.01p for shipping, I can't, I have to use Amazon's tiers. The way the process works is that Amazon will provide all the cost of a product, minus their commission, to the Seller, including all the shipping fees. Which means, as is usually the case, if a seller can ship the product to you cheaper than the quoted shipping fee, they get to pocket the balance.

Well it looks like plenty of people are responding to this, not sure if these guys have been doing this all along or not but, I found tons of treasures in Goodwill stores over the years, but not books. Now that Goodwill stopped putting treasures on the shelves and instead they list the stuff, I decided to slow down visiting them. Just looks like junkwill in there now. But after reading this page I went into Goodwill today to scan some books and there was this guy all over the books with a scanner and a cart just scanning– bam bam one after the other as fast as he could.
Assuming you have located some comparable books on these sites, if the prices quoted are for the most part $15 to $20 or more, there's a good chance you may be able to realize $10 or more by listing your item on eBay. If the prices are lower than this, chances are you've got a dog. Another rule of thumb: in my experience, it simply isn't worth the trouble to list a book that sells for less than $10.
Also, great advice on the obscure titles (I can see from your blog that you do indeed sell some obscure stuff :). It seems to work the same way for niche websites. The more obscure or “odd” the niche, the better my websites tend to do. People with unique interests are willing to pay a little more for the information they want. Thanks for sharing your advice, and if I decide to pursue this, I will let you know!
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That’s awesome that you are actually doing this. I think lots of people would be happy with $30/day…great job! Also, I agree that Adam Bertram seems to be a good resource; believe it or not I discovered him about a year ago and read his emails faithfully…even checked out his forum as a lurker. I posted this because I really would be interested in giving it a “real” shot…however, thats up to my readers to decide.
I am thrilled with your information and the help of your commenters. They all provided lots of help to sell my book collection. I have alot of research books, mainly Native American/Cherokee books and Vampire books and have decided to stop carting them around even though I love them. I am excited with the information provided here and will check them out.
The first question I naturally had was "How the hell can they make any money selling books at £0.01? I can't even source books at that price!" The answer came soon enough, if you add one of these books to your cart, you'll quickly see that there's a £1-2 shipping charge, and you can't use Super Saver Delivery. The interesting thing about selling on Amazon is that Amazon themselves set the delivery charge pricing. So even if I wanted to charge 0.01p for shipping, I can't, I have to use Amazon's tiers. The way the process works is that Amazon will provide all the cost of a product, minus their commission, to the Seller, including all the shipping fees. Which means, as is usually the case, if a seller can ship the product to you cheaper than the quoted shipping fee, they get to pocket the balance.
Who’s buying? Richard Davies, PR manager for the popular online marketplace Abebooks, describes the customer base as rather broad. “There are people who just want a cheap book,” he says, “and the used book market fulfills that really well.” Others, meanwhile, have more idiosyncratic requirements. “The book they need is not going to be in a Barnes & Noble.” So they turn to online retailers, where the “breadth of inventory really caters to people who have got a demanding taste”.

In some ways, the idea of selling books on Amazon is pretty self-evident and you could figure out most of it yourself. But, the tips on picking out good books and maintaining a good reputation are well-worth reading. Realistically, if you can do this, you have a better chance of turning a profit and you’ll be less likely to invest in books that don’t sell.
Yeah, some places definitely aren’t crazy about scanners. Personally, I never did it with the scanner method. As far as the fees go, I recommend looking for stuff that can cover your fees which are 15% of the price, roughly $3-4 for FBA, and $1.80 for media. Textbooks and niche books like comic books and stuff like that are pretty good for getting past the fees.

The big benefit to working through Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing, even though they charge you a commission on your sales, is their reach. Around 89 million Americans are said to be active ebook readers. That’s your potential audience, all those people visiting this site and browsing for a new book. It could be your book they find when doing a search on a related keyword. In fact, 38 percent of daily sales of ebooks on Amazon go to self-published titles.
Selling used books online also means that you have to maintain a physical stock of the books, while also shipping those out as sales are made. There is a fair amount of logistics involved in doing this, along with the physical space to store the books. Sure, if you score a few rarities you can put them in your closet. If you start buying in bulk, you may need a storage unit.
4. Over the years, I have used such credit to purchase an acoustic guitar for my older son, rent DVD’s and buy games. But, there is one other benefit of which most people are unaware. If there is nothing in the store you’d like to purchase, you can use the Hastings card to purchase gift cards for other businesses. For years, we paid for our AT&T go phone by purchasing phone card minutes at Hastings. I have also used such credit to purchase gift cards for Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse, Chili’s, On the Border, Macaroni Grill, Cracker Barrel and Sonic. Beyond food, Hastings also has gift cards for movie theaters, Footlocker, Champs and Itunes. Over the years, I have repeatedly bought a few dollars worth of books and traded them in for food, phone minutes, shoes and gifts.
When I first got started, I really didn’t know what kind of books to look for.  So after doing a little bit of research, I discovered that modern day first editions are collectible!  A modern day first edition is simply the first edition of a recent publication (in the past 30 years or so).  First editions for books older than this will typically command even higher prices.
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