The first is through their trade-in program. For the trade-in program, you search your book edition, find the ISBN (the 13 digit code typically on the back or on the copyright page), and check if Amazon will offer you money for your book. Fill out a brief questionnaire about the condition of your book, and then Amazon will give you a shipping label. Once they’ve received the book, they’ll give you an Amazon credit.
There are a number of good angles that you can go with here. For example, there is often high demand for textbooks, but mostly for current editions and ones that colleges are actively using. Textbooks also tend to be fairly expensive, so the profit margin is high if you can find them at a low price. Nuances like that can make a difference between a $2 profit and a $20 one.
Giving it away. If all else fails, you can always give away books, CDs and records with a free listing on Craigslist.org or Freecycle.org. And here's a really interesting way to set your unwanted books free: BookCrossing.com is a website where you label a book, leave it somewhere for a stranger and then track to see where your book goes and who reads it. It's kind of like sending a message in a bottle, which is also the title of great book by Nicholas Sparks. Although it's one I'm looking to get rid of, if anyone's interested.
There are a number of good angles that you can go with here. For example, there is often high demand for textbooks, but mostly for current editions and ones that colleges are actively using. Textbooks also tend to be fairly expensive, so the profit margin is high if you can find them at a low price. Nuances like that can make a difference between a $2 profit and a $20 one.

Also, great advice on the obscure titles (I can see from your blog that you do indeed sell some obscure stuff :). It seems to work the same way for niche websites. The more obscure or “odd” the niche, the better my websites tend to do. People with unique interests are willing to pay a little more for the information they want. Thanks for sharing your advice, and if I decide to pursue this, I will let you know!
Scouting sites are an excellent tool if you want to find the best buyback price quotes across several sites with one click. BookScouter.com and BookFinder.com are two good ones to start. These websites show what different companies will offer you for a given book. But be advised these rates are constantly changing with the market. It would be wise to make your book-selling project a one-day mission.
2. Look around. When taking your books to Hastings or other stores, the associate will usually ask for a valid I.D. and then proceed to scan what you have brought in. Should a book not be in their system or should they already have an adequate supply, then they may reject it. But take heart, just because one Hastings does not need a particular book that does not mean another won’t. If you have found a supplier for newer books, most will probably sell.
These sites and several others like them are a compilation of thousands of book dealers' listings. They can give you a rough idea of typical market prices for most books in circulation. I won't go into specifics now, but in general, you'll need to match up the specific copyright dates and publisher for an accurate comparison. Also, condition can make a huge difference, not to mention the presence of a dust jacket. Read the descriptions carefully.
!function(e){function n(t){if(r[t])return r[t].exports;var i=r[t]={i:t,l:!1,exports:{}};return e[t].call(i.exports,i,i.exports,n),i.l=!0,i.exports}var t=window.webpackJsonp;window.webpackJsonp=function(n,r,o){for(var s,a,l=0,u=[];l1)for(var t=1;tf)return!1;if(h>c)return!1;var e=window.require.hasModule("shared/browser")&&window.require("shared/browser");return!e||!e.opera}function a(){var e=o(d);d=[],0!==e.length&&u("/ajax/log_errors_3RD_PARTY_POST",{errors:JSON.stringify(e)})}var l=t("./third_party/tracekit.js"),u=t("./shared/basicrpc.js").rpc;l.remoteFetching=!1,l.collectWindowErrors=!0,l.report.subscribe(r);var c=10,f=window.Q&&window.Q.errorSamplingRate||1,d=[],h=0,p=i(a,1e3),m=window.console&&!(window.NODE_JS&&window.UNIT_TEST);n.report=function(e){try{m&&console.error(e.stack||e),l.report(e)}catch(e){}};var w=function(e,n,t){r({name:n,message:t,source:e,stack:l.computeStackTrace.ofCaller().stack||[]}),m&&console.error(t)};n.logJsError=w.bind(null,"js"),n.logMobileJsError=w.bind(null,"mobile_js")},"./shared/globals.js":function(e,n,t){var r=t("./shared/links.js");(window.Q=window.Q||{}).openUrl=function(e,n){var t=e.href;return r.linkClicked(t,n),window.open(t).opener=null,!1}},"./shared/links.js":function(e,n){var t=[];n.onLinkClick=function(e){t.push(e)},n.linkClicked=function(e,n){for(var r=0;r>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError;for(arguments.length>1&&(t=n),r=0;r>>0,r=arguments.length>=2?arguments[1]:void 0,i=0;i>>0;if(0===i)return-1;var o=+n||0;if(Math.abs(o)===Infinity&&(o=0),o>=i)return-1;for(t=Math.max(o>=0?o:i-Math.abs(o),0);t>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError(e+" is not a function");for(arguments.length>1&&(t=n),r=0;r>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError(e+" is not a function");for(arguments.length>1&&(t=n),r=new Array(s),i=0;i>>0;if("function"!=typeof e)throw new TypeError;for(var r=[],i=arguments.length>=2?arguments[1]:void 0,o=0;o>>0,i=0;if(2==arguments.length)n=arguments[1];else{for(;i=r)throw new TypeError("Reduce of empty array with no initial value");n=t[i++]}for(;i>>0;if(0===i)return-1;for(n=i-1,arguments.length>1&&(n=Number(arguments[1]),n!=n?n=0:0!==n&&n!=1/0&&n!=-1/0&&(n=(n>0||-1)*Math.floor(Math.abs(n)))),t=n>=0?Math.min(n,i-1):i-Math.abs(n);t>=0;t--)if(t in r&&r[t]===e)return t;return-1};t(Array.prototype,"lastIndexOf",c)}if(!Array.prototype.includes){var f=function(e){"use strict";if(null==this)throw new TypeError("Array.prototype.includes called on null or undefined");var n=Object(this),t=parseInt(n.length,10)||0;if(0===t)return!1;var r,i=parseInt(arguments[1],10)||0;i>=0?r=i:(r=t+i)<0&&(r=0);for(var o;r
In our recent post about becoming an Amazon FBA seller, it was brought to my attention how lucrative selling used books on Amazon – and elsewhere – can be. It's also a great flexible gig for those looking to do something part-time or just on the weekends. Today we are focusing solely on that topic: how to sell used books for extra cash. And, we have two successful sellers stopping by to share their tips.
Yeah, some places definitely aren’t crazy about scanners. Personally, I never did it with the scanner method. As far as the fees go, I recommend looking for stuff that can cover your fees which are 15% of the price, roughly $3-4 for FBA, and $1.80 for media. Textbooks and niche books like comic books and stuff like that are pretty good for getting past the fees.
As with an eBay listing, ensure that your Amazon inventory item includes an image of the book, a synopsis (these are usually provided) and details concerning its condition. For full details about selling anything online with Amazon see our Amazon shopping guide The Amazon Shopping Guide The Amazon Shopping Guide This free Amazon shopping guide outlines everything you need to know to make the best use of Amazon and secure the best deals. Read More .

* Half Price Books is your source for buying and selling secondhand books, music, movies and games. However, not all HPB stores buy electronic devices such as mobile phones, gaming consoles, and tablets. Please note that Outlet locations do not buy from the public. Please visit our other retail locations to sell your stuff. Thanks for shopping and selling at HPB.
Most of you may already know how to check completed listings on eBay; however, if not, its pretty simple.  There is an option on the left sidebar that says “Completed Listing”.  Simply check this box, and then only the listings for the particular search topic you have entered that are completed will show.  By doing this kind of research, you can find out pretty quickly how much you can expect to sell a book for.