Rare and antique books are a specialist market within the general antiques and collectables trade. Their price is determined not just by a book’s condition but also by how other investment markets are doing. There are always investors with cash to splash even in times of recession. When interest rates are low, cash moves into other investment classes. The value of antiques and other “collectables” including books may rise as a result.
Incidentally, if you don’t want to sell your books for cash but would prefer to barter or swap them 5 Money Saving Sites Which Uses The Bartering System 5 Money Saving Sites Which Uses The Bartering System There are several sites on the Internet that could possibly save you money through the process of exchanging goods and services in lieu of monetary compensation. Bartering websites are similar to eBay in which ads... Read More , various sites exist that support this method of payment.
List the book for sale – If it looks worth your while to sell the book, head over to your seller account and get it listed. You can do a quick search here by title or ISBN to find the book. You will then be asked about the condition of the book, how many you have available, how you will ship it (Amazon gives you a $3.99 shipping credit for each book) and how much you want to sell it for. You're probably going to want to go with the lowest listed price if you want to sell your item quickly. People wanting to purchase used books want them as cheap as possible.
You see, what the big publishing houses do with big offices of editors, writers, administrative staff… and then big printing presses… then distribution centers to get their books out to bookstores around the country… all to hopefully get books in the hands of customers… you can do on the computer you have right now. If that’s not massive disruption, I don’t know what is.
1. Purchase books that are in good condition, without marks in the text and without a remainder mark (a marked line) on the bottom edge of the pages. Hardback books that originally came with a cover need to have the cover. Paperback books are fine provided they are trade paper (the larger books) and not mass market (the books that are roughly the length and width of a checkbook). Also, it is important that any book you attempt to trade in at Hastings have a barcode on the back. While older books may sell on Amazon, they typically are not eligible for sales at Hastings.
Check the Condition of Your Book: Most buyback sites only accept used textbooks that are in good condition or better. Before you sell your book, make sure that it has minimal highlighting, little or no cover damage, no torn pages, an unbroken spine, no water or moisture damage, no mold, or other stains or smells. So basically if you used your book to clean the spilled beer in your dorm, then chances are you’re not going to turn that book into cash.
Books are heavy items. Most buyers will expect to have their books delivered to them and you need to consider shipping and postage costs when you price your wares. Some websites have standard postal charge (e.g. Amazon). This may not cover the actual shipping costs. So make sure the book sale price is sufficient to cover your outgoings and make a profit for you. Some websites (e.g. eBay) allow you to determine what (if anything) you want to charge for shipping on top of the sale price. You may also be able to specify different costs for tracked delivery compared to standard delivery.

But if books aren't your thing and you just wanted a simple way to make money online, you can make an affiliate marketing website on pretty much anything – books are just one example. As such, affiliate marketing becomes a great way to talk about or promote pretty much any hobby or passion, without having to worry about finding products, shipping or dealing with customer service. That’s a win all around.
Be warned that Powell’s “buyers are very particular about condition,” according to its website. Don’t try to send them former library books; advance reader copies; books with tears, broken bindings, or highlighting; or hardcovers without a dust jacket. (Powell’s website has a visual guide to problems that will cause it to reject a title.) Rejected titles are donated or recycled.
Also, great advice on the obscure titles (I can see from your blog that you do indeed sell some obscure stuff :). It seems to work the same way for niche websites. The more obscure or “odd” the niche, the better my websites tend to do. People with unique interests are willing to pay a little more for the information they want. Thanks for sharing your advice, and if I decide to pursue this, I will let you know!

We'll pay cash for your books, textbooks, music, movies, mobile phones, tablets, games, gaming consoles, e-readers and more(excluding Outlet locations)!* You can spend the cash in the store or take it home with you. We pay the most for recent bestsellers and collectibles, but we're also interested in good books, music, and movies of all kinds. The primary factors we consider when buying used merchandise of any kind are: 1.) condition 2.) supply and demand.

All throughout college, I made quite a bit of money doing this. I would buy my text books and reading books on half.com or other cheap sites, use them for class (without marking them up) and then sell them online or to the on campus bookstore. The bookstore would actually pay about 2-3 times what I bought them for because they were used to selling at full price, paying about 25-30% buy back and re-selling again for a profit.

Amazon.com. Amazon charges individual sellers 99 cents per item that sells, so it only makes sense to list items on which you'll make a worthwhile profit. You only can sell items that are already currently listed on Amazon, which, of course, includes tons of book titles, CDs and some vinyl — but may not include everything in the collection you're looking to unload.
Instead of scanning each and every book at a book sale, I’d just make offers on the entire lot. This worked especially well at yard sales, estate sales, and even book store closings. By being indiscriminate, it meant that I could get the price per book way down (usually less than $0.25 per book), but also meant that I was left with a lot of duds. With good purchases, I’d usually have 3 “donate” books for every 1 book I listed. So, effectively, my inventory cost $1.00 per item.

Be warned that Powell’s “buyers are very particular about condition,” according to its website. Don’t try to send them former library books; advance reader copies; books with tears, broken bindings, or highlighting; or hardcovers without a dust jacket. (Powell’s website has a visual guide to problems that will cause it to reject a title.) Rejected titles are donated or recycled.
For older books, a quick trip to eBay, Amazon or any of the sites listed below will give you an idea of how much the book will sell for. Sometimes it can be quite discouraging to find a title that once cost $5 is now just 50 cents, but if you’re determined to sell (remember, 10 such titles will generate $5) you should spend time determining which marketplace is most appropriate for that book.
If you find you enjoy selling books online and make a profit you will need to replenish stock in order to sell more. This is where experience and research will determine future success. Just because a book is old, does not mean it is valuable. The opposite may also be true. Some new books are sought after because their publishers miscalculated their popularity and so produced print runs that did not meet demand.
It’s possible to get a higher selling price by selling the book yourself than that offered on by a textbook buyback site. Just keep in mind that Amazon will keep a small commission of approximately 15% and you are responsible for paying shipping costs. You do get a small shipping credit, but, it still might not be enough to offset the cost postage & packaging materials.
Make money selling used books isn’t as hard as one might think.  Sure we are all hoping we land on a rare 18th century 1st edition book signed by the author but besides landing on a once-in-a-lifetime find, there are other ways of making money with used books.  Best of all, flipping these days are much easier due to new tools available to the general public.  Let’s take a look at how to make money selling used books.

You can set up a professional seller account on AbeBooks. But if you only have a few titles to unload, using its book-buyback service might be more convenient. The site (owned by Amazon) claims to have the largest online buyback catalog. It says it “can usually beat your local college bookstore on price.” But you’ll need to have at least $15 worth of books to sell, and they must be in good condition. If your old textbooks don’t meet AbeBooks’ standards, they’ll be recycled, and you won’t get a penny.

I have sold a few hundred books on ebay. Books of all types, especially more obscure books that would have a very limited prospective group of interested parties. I nearly always charge for shipping, usually making some extra money for this to help cover bubble wrap, tape, padded mailers and even gas to the post office ! Usually start with an auction format, then if the book does not sell, I change to a good til cancelled format. It then stays listed on ebay until it sells or you decide to delist it. You do incur more fees that way, but books that I have found at yard sales. library sales, etc. often surprise me at how much they sell for. I have had books that I bought in a bag sale at the library sell for as much as $150.00 ! so patience is often worth it. I never know what will sell, nor for how much, but several times a week I open my ebay account and find something that has been listed for months has now sold. So, if you can wait to be paid for your books, ebay is a great site. If you need your money right now, the other sites seem to be better, but you will seldom get top dollar.
In general, mercifully, Ward says Thrift Books “errs on the side of keeping more books than we need to”, and his software’s algorithms single out rare titles for protection even if market demand doesn’t warrant it. What they can’t sell, they recycle. That proves to be quite a few books: last year alone they recycled 130m pounds. What remains after a bookseller’s vetting process stocks their virtual storefronts.
If you’re selling books FBA (I recommend that you do), you’ll need to send them to the nearest fulfillment center (or centers). It’s pretty easy to do. Just throw them in a box (I like Home Depot’s Small Moving Boxes because they’re pretty cheap), and ship via one of Amazon’s preferred carriers. Don’t forget to mark the shipping costs in your Fetcher back screen!
To add even more grimness, we began hearing about “Counterfeit” textbooks. WHAT? Apparently, there are counterfeit textbooks, and I talked to two people who have bought & sold books for years, who both claimed to have lost $700 and over $800 due to counterfeits. No one who bought and sold textbooks knew what a ‘counterfeit’ looked like? Then there’s the nefarious bookstores who were telling people that they had been sent ‘counterfeit’ books by them, and the bookstores refused to pay them. They also wouldn’t send those books back to them! About that time, I decided to cut my losses. I thought it might be time to do something else.
HI Dave I received an email saying that I can post some of my books with fulfillment. I am a little worried to do it so I stepped back and did not do it. So far since I started selling books I had being selling them in a 1 or 2 books per day but I noticed that in the Amazon page I am in the third or fifth page. So my question is should I jump to the pool and send all my books to fulfillment and all in all what will be my cost vs benefits.

Search by ISBN: The ISBN (International Standard Book Number) is a unique number located on the back of your book that identifies the particular title, author, and edition of a book. Some books have 10-digit ISBNs, others have 13 digits. Searching by ISBN ensures that you will be quoted the correct buyback prices on the exact book and edition you are selling.

×