The first question I naturally had was "How the hell can they make any money selling books at £0.01? I can't even source books at that price!" The answer came soon enough, if you add one of these books to your cart, you'll quickly see that there's a £1-2 shipping charge, and you can't use Super Saver Delivery. The interesting thing about selling on Amazon is that Amazon themselves set the delivery charge pricing. So even if I wanted to charge 0.01p for shipping, I can't, I have to use Amazon's tiers. The way the process works is that Amazon will provide all the cost of a product, minus their commission, to the Seller, including all the shipping fees. Which means, as is usually the case, if a seller can ship the product to you cheaper than the quoted shipping fee, they get to pocket the balance.


I am about to retire, and I have about 6 thousand books in my personal library. Many of these are professional books: religious topics, Bible commentaries, and so on. I had thought to sell a lot of these on Amazon, but I really can’t understand how people can make a profit for those book that are listed at one cent, or four or five dollars. As I have looked up some of my books, I find that some of them might go for 10=15 dollars, so that might be worth it. But I figured I would do the fulfillment myself. What I have are books likely to be found by people looking for that specific title or topic. I have bought many books through Amazon for a penny, with the $3.99 shipping added. Is that enough to turn a profit?
In general, mercifully, Ward says Thrift Books “errs on the side of keeping more books than we need to”, and his software’s algorithms single out rare titles for protection even if market demand doesn’t warrant it. What they can’t sell, they recycle. That proves to be quite a few books: last year alone they recycled 130m pounds. What remains after a bookseller’s vetting process stocks their virtual storefronts.
which scanner app do you use or recommend? how did you come up with that list of text books? that sounds like an interesting idea. i am selling books on Amazon now and have almost 2000 in my garage. with the fee increase plus 15% plus packing materials I will not get rich. However, the thought of labeling and mailing that many books to Amazon is daunting. do you make that many more sales going prime to justify the cost?
You might check other bookstores to see if any of them have a similar program. One tactic I have used is to take a box of books with me when we drive out of town. The titles were ones that my local Hastings didn’t need, mainly because of their present inventory, but I could then sell to other Hastings in other cities. So I have taken a box of books when we have gone on vacation, visited relatives, etc.
Peter, on the other hand, believes Amazon is where the big money is at. He is a high volume seller, however, earning over $130,000 in his first year as an Amazon FBA seller. Peter say’s, Amazon isn't just the biggest bookstore in the world anymore, it's the biggest store – period. The truth is that I have never met anyone selling books online who makes money anywhere except Amazon. It's where the book buyers are, and where the money is.”
There comes a time in every reader’s life where they have to accept some hard truths: that not every book they’ve read is one they should treasure forever; that they don’t need three different copies of their favorite classic, even if it keeps being re-released with cooler covers; that decorating in towering stacks of books might not be the healthiest choice, unless they want to start wearing helmets around the house. When you’ve come to this point, you will want to clean out your collection. And, that may mean it’s time to sell books (*gasp!*).
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