Right before we moved, I started shedding all the personal finance books I’d been sent over the years. The quickest way, though it won’t net the most money, is to trade them in for credit on Amazon. Just list them, pack them in a box or envelope, and send them on their merry way. For the more valuable titles, listing them for sale at the lowest price on Amazon meant it probably lasted a week before it was sold… but then you had to print each one individually. I got rid of probably 30-40 books that way and pocketed maybe a few hundred bucks?

Thanks for this list of book buyback options. I use Chegg and Valore Books as well and think they are pretty good. Valore often has a highest offer guarantee which is nice. I think bigwords.com is my favorite site though since it compares so many websites for you to get the highest offer price. I had not heard of several listed here however so it is definitely helpful info! Thanks so much!
2. Look around. When taking your books to Hastings or other stores, the associate will usually ask for a valid I.D. and then proceed to scan what you have brought in. Should a book not be in their system or should they already have an adequate supply, then they may reject it. But take heart, just because one Hastings does not need a particular book that does not mean another won’t. If you have found a supplier for newer books, most will probably sell.

Another strategy that has also proven quite rewarding is by selling books, CD’s and DVD’s at chain bookstores. I know that several franchises, with stores in multiple cities, purchase used books. Half Price Books is one of them. But my experience and specific tips are based upon sales to Hastings Entertainment, although I suspect that most of the strategies I’ll share are applicable to other establishments as well.

List the book for sale – If it looks worth your while to sell the book, head over to your seller account and get it listed. You can do a quick search here by title or ISBN to find the book. You will then be asked about the condition of the book, how many you have available, how you will ship it (Amazon gives you a $3.99 shipping credit for each book) and how much you want to sell it for. You're probably going to want to go with the lowest listed price if you want to sell your item quickly. People wanting to purchase used books want them as cheap as possible.
There it sat on a shelf, priced at $1, until a semi-trailer from Books Squared whisked it away among 3,000 other leftovers. At the Books Squared warehouse in south-west Dallas, Our Gang was checked and processed by receivers and a scrupulous quality-control team, who deemed the book “like new” before scanning it into their computer system to be sold online.

HI Dave I received an email saying that I can post some of my books with fulfillment. I am a little worried to do it so I stepped back and did not do it. So far since I started selling books I had being selling them in a 1 or 2 books per day but I noticed that in the Amazon page I am in the third or fifth page. So my question is should I jump to the pool and send all my books to fulfillment and all in all what will be my cost vs benefits.
Basically, those that use the scanning method go to sales where books are priced dirt cheap (usually under $1.00) and scan each and every bar code with their cell phone or portable scanner. An app on their phone cross reference’s the book’s BSR as well as the book’s lowest sales price and lets the seller know whether or not the book is worth purchasing. Typically, a Scanner will carry a box, shopping cart, or many reusable shopping bags to lug their goods around.
Also, great advice on the obscure titles (I can see from your blog that you do indeed sell some obscure stuff :). It seems to work the same way for niche websites. The more obscure or “odd” the niche, the better my websites tend to do. People with unique interests are willing to pay a little more for the information they want. Thanks for sharing your advice, and if I decide to pursue this, I will let you know!
Garage Sales / Free Markets – Many times you see boxes of books for sale marked $.25 – $1.00.  Rather than try to figure out how much each book would net you, make a deal with the seller.  Offer to buy the whole box of books for a buck or two.  This works extremely well towards the end of the day when they are about done.  Most likely the seller just wants the books gone and is willing to take anything.  I bet some would even allow you to have them for free.

I found your blog through Pat Flynn’s link! I currently live in Mesa, AZ and started in online business with selling used and collectible used books as well during college. I worked in a local used bookstore so I learned pretty quick which books were excellent to purchase to resell at a markup. I then saved the money I made to pursue a vintage clothing business, then a wool felt business. I quit my horrid job with the government this year in March (the 4th) to work on my online business full time. What a joy! Although my current business isn’t passive, I’m looking to create more passive streams of income. Thanks for all of the information you provide in your blog!
You might check other bookstores to see if any of them have a similar program. One tactic I have used is to take a box of books with me when we drive out of town. The titles were ones that my local Hastings didn’t need, mainly because of their present inventory, but I could then sell to other Hastings in other cities. So I have taken a box of books when we have gone on vacation, visited relatives, etc.
Good read. I’ll give it a try just for fun. One question though. How can Amazon accept a box where “I just throw in the books” without labeling each since one box would contain 40-50 different books. How do they stock them without a label on each book? They sent me an email today asking to put a label on each product, which seems like a lot of work.
One of the first questions that arises when contemplating selling books online is, how do I know which books will sell? A quick glance at eBay book listings might discourage you from selling them at all because, sadly, the majority of books offered for auction ultimately receive no bids whatsoever. This is why it's crucial that you do your homework before spending the time and energy to list a book for auction.
Selling Used Books Online?” The answer to that is you used to be able to make very good money doing that. Not any more. First, everybody and their 5 favorite Aunts all think they can make a good living doing it, so the competition is seriously overwhelming! Often, you can find pages and pages of the same book for sale online at multiple sites, all in the same very good condition , so it’s very competitive. There is a market for specialized current edition textbooks, but that market has become saturated. Both Ebay and Amazon have raised their rates at least twice this year, and if you sell used books on Amazon, you’ll be paying close to 40% of your proceeds to them. Ebay was a hair less, last time I compared, but they have more fees. That’s more than enough to wipe out your profits, so you end up with a net loss! The profit margins have become razor thin, and many complain about losing money. If you send books to Amazon for their FBA program, and the books don’t sell in a timely fashion, you’ll be paying rent to Amazon to store them or pay to have them destroyed. That’s not good!
I check the selling price of Go Set a Watchman, a hardcover book I paid full price for, but one that I honestly never want to see on my shelves again. BookScouter says that one (just one) of the websites they scan will buy my copy for $0.12. Harsh. I didn’t like it either, guys, but that’s like $0.25 less than what it probably cost to print the dang book. My paperback of To Kill a Mockingbird, on the other hand, will go to three different sites for as much as $0.75.
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