Great tips! I love trading in books. Every time I take a trip to visit my parents I bring a big bag of books to trade in at their local used bookstore. That store is probably one of my top ten favorite places. Sometimes I will take the cash, but usually, I just want store credit. We like to use the trade in money to buy new books for our kids since we homeschool. Sometimes I will treat myself and use the money to add a new book to my collection of antique books.
If you're okay with receiving gift cards instead of cash for your books, Amazon has an excellent book buyback program. They advertise that they pay up to 80% of the value of a book, and that could prove to be significantly more than what book re-sellers are currently paying. With all the things that Amazon sells, a gift card is almost as good as cash. It won't put gas in your car or pay your bills, but it'll buy just about anything else you need.
Without a decent description you’re unlikely to sell a book. As far as eBay goes, you should include an image of the book, its synopsis (the blurb on the back cover) and statements concerning the condition of the book. Highlight rips or tears, dog ears (those top-corner bends to mark a page in the absence of a bookmark), and scrawlings or other markings, loose or broken bindings, any creases in the bindings, and creases on the front or back of a paperback book.
Thanks for the information.I’m selling books part-time on Amazon.When it comes to sourcing book it really needs some effort and time.I source books which have a good sales rank and sales history for that I have to understand the Keepa graph which is really difficult but last month I found a free statistical search engine for books http://www.amstick.com . It easy to understand and saves a lot of time.Hope this will help books sellers like me.
You could also figure this out by paying attention to what other people are selling and the types of books that people look for. Over time, your perceptions are likely to get more refined, as you figure out what books actually end up selling and what ones simply go nowhere. For example, did you consider that old school textbooks could be a great specialty? Or what about rare bible versions? First editions are also in high demand.
When you sell a product on Ebay, it’s you AND your listing that’s competing. And even if you’re the cheapest or best entry, you might not appear on the first page of search results (not unless the shopper uses the filters, of course). And despite the fact that my comic books were priced aggressively, the listings whose sellers had been selling on Ebay longer (sometimes for a decade or more) were given precedence.

When I click the link to make an “Individual Seller” account and it gets to my Bank info, It says that I am making a “Professional Account” and only gives me that option, and says that once I put in my card info, that they will bill me for the $39.99. I never even wanted any of that. I wanted the Individual and free option. So I called customer service 3 times and all times, they said that they are in the middle of some stuff and that my only option is to select the “Professional Seller” account and to pay the $39.99 and that they would immediately refund me the money and downgrade my account to Individual from there. I don’t know, that seems fishy to me. They said that a lot of people have been having this same question to them lately and that is what they have been telling them to do. Have you encountered this? I saw someone in your comments just 20 days ago say that he was able to make an individual account. Not fair! Please shed some light on this if you will.
Be warned that Powell’s “buyers are very particular about condition,” according to its website. Don’t try to send them former library books; advance reader copies; books with tears, broken bindings, or highlighting; or hardcovers without a dust jacket. (Powell’s website has a visual guide to problems that will cause it to reject a title.) Rejected titles are donated or recycled.
According to CheatSheet.com, AbeBooks will “buy back” old textbooks or other lightly used reading copies, and they pay by check. Similarly, Powell’s buys used copies but has a very strict policy about the condition of your books. Expect to receive a check - but if you plan on buying additional books, you’ll get more bang for your buck by taking store credit.
When asked to share what new sellers should look for when scouting books. Lori replied, “The most important thing is to look to places where you can acquire books very cheaply. Fancy collector's editions are generally worth the trouble of selling if you pay the right price for them, but most of the time, they aren't worth what you might think. Unless you know for a fact that a book is worth money, be extremely cautious about overpaying. The same thing applies to first editions – I've acquired many firsts that only ended up being worth two or three dollars, so don't let that fool you unless you're familiar with a particular title.  Also, it's ironic, but in general, you want to avoid bestsellers. There are so many copies in existence that the used book markets are often flooded with them. I also tend to pick up books I've sold before – first, because I will already have a listing created, which saves me some time, and second, because I know it did sell, and believe me, there are plenty of books that don't. Finally, consider your marketplace and how you will be creating your listings. It takes me less time to list individual books in a series than it does totally separate titles, so I will tend to favor those when I'm buying in bulk.”
Take a book, plug in the ISBN number to a couple of scouting sites, and label the book with the best prices on a sticky note before you make your final counts. These scouting sites might direct you to sell your books with dealers, such as ValoreBooks, TextbookRush, and Chegg. Most of these sites are hit or miss depending on the book. Also, scouting sites can be unreliable, so check the actual buyer sites to confirm their rates.
I check the selling price of Go Set a Watchman, a hardcover book I paid full price for, but one that I honestly never want to see on my shelves again. BookScouter says that one (just one) of the websites they scan will buy my copy for $0.12. Harsh. I didn’t like it either, guys, but that’s like $0.25 less than what it probably cost to print the dang book. My paperback of To Kill a Mockingbird, on the other hand, will go to three different sites for as much as $0.75.
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