Search by ISBN: The ISBN (International Standard Book Number) is a unique number located on the back of your book that identifies the particular title, author, and edition of a book. Some books have 10-digit ISBNs, others have 13 digits. Searching by ISBN ensures that you will be quoted the correct buyback prices on the exact book and edition you are selling.

Dynamic pricing software cross-referenced every active listing of a used, like-new, hardcover copy of Our Gang across online marketplaces like Amazon and Abebooks, then matched the lowest price. Last March, four months after it was listed, I bought the book for a penny, and Books Squared shipped it to my apartment in Toronto. This handsome volume is sitting proudly on my desk right now.
They pay the most for more recent publications and those that are in high demand, but will buy all your books, not making you haul some of them away that don't meet their standards. But the ones that they decide not to sell won't of course, give you much if any cash and they'll donate them or recycle them. But you don't have to deal with disposal for any not worth anything!
Just because you are self-publishing doesn’t mean you want it to like an amateur did it. Hire a graphic designer on a site like Fiverr.com to create a good-looking cover based on your direction and input for not much money. They can also lay out the interior pages too. Just because your book is self-published doesn't mean it has to look and feel that way.
“Just wanted to let you know that I had a great experience selling through your company. I had some textbooks that I no longer needed and were in good shape. I got the exact price for them that I was quoted. There was no hassle with the Fedex shipping. I just sent the textbooks in the mail yesterday and received notification today that the money was already in my PayPal account. Fantastic service! Thank you so much.” - Kaity C.
Scouting sites are an excellent tool if you want to find the best buyback price quotes across several sites with one click. BookScouter.com and BookFinder.com are two good ones to start. These websites show what different companies will offer you for a given book. But be advised these rates are constantly changing with the market. It would be wise to make your book-selling project a one-day mission.
Congrats on publishing! Either way, honestly. If you’ve already got cases of them, it’s probably just easier to send one or two cases to Amazon and see how you do. Amazon also offers Kindle Direct Publishing and Create Space services for self-published authors, which are both totally cool. Sure, they take a big ol’ bite out of your profits, but there’s no cost of goods on your end except for marketing. KDP is all digital. And Create Space is print-on-demand.

“The initial reason was that I owned a lot – and was continually acquiring more. They were all over the house, and I figured it made sense to start unloading some of those I had already read before I had to turn my kitchen into a library, too! I didn't start doing it seriously, however, until I made the leap to full-time author last year. I knew I wasn't going to be making money for a while, and I liked the idea of having a part-time gig I could do on my own schedule.”
If you're planning on selling no more that 35 items a month (which is likely to be the case, unless you've been hoarding your books for years), you'll just need to sign up for a basic account  – or a 'Sell a Little' account, as Amazon calls it. Then, it's just a case of uploading the details of your books and their condition, and waiting for someone to buy them.

Interesting read! I’ve been looking at FBA but for private label, hadn’t considered physical books. I’ve been on the other side of Amazon selling for years, digital books, being one of the longest online independent e-publishers around, but in recent years there has been a big change in how Amazon handles that side. My question for physical books is, you say you just put them in a box and ship to a fulfillment center. Does a listing need to be included in the box with title and ISBN or something for identifier for the fulfillment center? Wondering the prep involved. Books are heavy also, does shipping costs of boxes of books become high?
We'll pay cash for your books, textbooks, music, movies, mobile phones, tablets, games, gaming consoles, e-readers and more(excluding Outlet locations)!* You can spend the cash in the store or take it home with you. We pay the most for recent bestsellers and collectibles, but we're also interested in good books, music, and movies of all kinds. The primary factors we consider when buying used merchandise of any kind are: 1.) condition 2.) supply and demand.
According to CheatSheet.com, AbeBooks will “buy back” old textbooks or other lightly used reading copies, and they pay by check. Similarly, Powell’s buys used copies but has a very strict policy about the condition of your books. Expect to receive a check - but if you plan on buying additional books, you’ll get more bang for your buck by taking store credit.

Swapping. OK, so it may not succeed in freeing up any additional shelf space, but there are plenty of opportunities online to trade your unwanted books for other titles you'd like to read. On most book swap websites, you get a credit for every book you send to someone else, which you can then redeem with other traders for the books you really want. Usually you just have to pay postage for the books you send, not the ones you receive. Popular sites include BookMooch.com, PaperBackSwap.com or TitleTrader.com. Or you could always hold an old-fashioned swap meet with your neighbors, friends and family.
Great tips! I love trading in books. Every time I take a trip to visit my parents I bring a big bag of books to trade in at their local used bookstore. That store is probably one of my top ten favorite places. Sometimes I will take the cash, but usually, I just want store credit. We like to use the trade in money to buy new books for our kids since we homeschool. Sometimes I will treat myself and use the money to add a new book to my collection of antique books.
I am in the process of self-publishing an illustrated children’s book, which I intend to sell through my web shop and also via Amazon. What would be the best Amazon program to start with, since I want to focus on the US market, and also on the English speaking market in Europe? Would you recommend starting with the Pro account and use Linked Accounts for the North America & EU market places? If I sent my inventory to a fulfilment centre in Europe, under what conditions could the books be sold/sent to the USA? I am unable to find these answers, any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance for your time to respond!
This is also a great field if you are a book lover because there are many companies out there selling books that have affiliate programs. In fact, Amazon even has an affiliate program called Amazon Associates, and you can make money promoting the various physical and digital books. The great thing about doing this is that you don’t actually have to go out and find the books, or deal with shipping and returns.

To sell on Amazon, you’ll need an Amazon seller account. There are two types of accounts you can start: individual and professional. Individual is free, but you pay an extra $1.00 per sale. Meanwhile, professional costs $39.95 per month, but doesn’t have the $1.00 extra fee. So basically, if you think you’re going to sell more than 40 units per month (to put it in perspective, I sold 300 books per month when I started) get the professional selling plan.

Of course, there are plenty of other ways to go about this: you may want to do the KonMari method, you may just go for a good ol’ spring cleaning. You may need to recite some of Alice’s helpful mantras to yourself. However you do it, you will hopefully be left with large stacks of books to dispose of. You could give them away or donate them, which is quite noble, but it is always nice to be able to get a little money back from everything you’ve paid out to your bookshelves.
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