Amazon.com. Amazon charges individual sellers 99 cents per item that sells, so it only makes sense to list items on which you'll make a worthwhile profit. You only can sell items that are already currently listed on Amazon, which, of course, includes tons of book titles, CDs and some vinyl — but may not include everything in the collection you're looking to unload.
There are some key differences between this self-publishing (which, by the way, doesn’t have the negative connotations it used to) and traditional publishing process. You won’t be dealing with printed books, for one. That eliminates the expense and hassle of actually creating books, storing them, and delivering them — and that may not even sell. It’s going to be all digital. These are ebooks, which can be read on devices like Amazon’s Kindle, on another tablet or smartphone, or even on a computer.
As a result, literature is better off. These used book sellers are providing an indispensable public service: they’re redirecting the world’s flow of used books from extinction to readers who can care for and appreciate them. “Before companies like ours,” Stephens tells me, “used books went to the landfill. The charities tossed them or sent them to pulping companies.”

Most of you may already know how to check completed listings on eBay; however, if not, its pretty simple.  There is an option on the left sidebar that says “Completed Listing”.  Simply check this box, and then only the listings for the particular search topic you have entered that are completed will show.  By doing this kind of research, you can find out pretty quickly how much you can expect to sell a book for.
Thanks for this list of book buyback options. I use Chegg and Valore Books as well and think they are pretty good. Valore often has a highest offer guarantee which is nice. I think bigwords.com is my favorite site though since it compares so many websites for you to get the highest offer price. I had not heard of several listed here however so it is definitely helpful info! Thanks so much!
Hey Thomas – yeah it is an interesting idea. You are right that its not as passive as other ideas, but that’s okay. Not everything I am considering has to be passive. Perhaps its only feasible for the average person to build this to a $500 to $1000/mth business. However, maybe that is all someone is looking for. Overall, I agree with you though that it would be difficult (although not impossible) to build this into a full time business.
For truly valuable and rare books, online booksellers are not the best place to find reliable information on achievable prices. These websites show the price a seller would like to achieve, not what a buyer is actually willing to pay. The seller has nothing to lose by asking a totally unachievable price in the hope of catching someone with more money than sense.
If you're planning on selling no more that 35 items a month (which is likely to be the case, unless you've been hoarding your books for years), you'll just need to sign up for a basic account  – or a 'Sell a Little' account, as Amazon calls it. Then, it's just a case of uploading the details of your books and their condition, and waiting for someone to buy them.
As with an eBay listing, ensure that your Amazon inventory item includes an image of the book, a synopsis (these are usually provided) and details concerning its condition. For full details about selling anything online with Amazon see our Amazon shopping guide The Amazon Shopping Guide The Amazon Shopping Guide This free Amazon shopping guide outlines everything you need to know to make the best use of Amazon and secure the best deals. Read More .
There are some key differences between this self-publishing (which, by the way, doesn’t have the negative connotations it used to) and traditional publishing process. You won’t be dealing with printed books, for one. That eliminates the expense and hassle of actually creating books, storing them, and delivering them — and that may not even sell. It’s going to be all digital. These are ebooks, which can be read on devices like Amazon’s Kindle, on another tablet or smartphone, or even on a computer.
List the book for sale – If it looks worth your while to sell the book, head over to your seller account and get it listed. You can do a quick search here by title or ISBN to find the book. You will then be asked about the condition of the book, how many you have available, how you will ship it (Amazon gives you a $3.99 shipping credit for each book) and how much you want to sell it for. You're probably going to want to go with the lowest listed price if you want to sell your item quickly. People wanting to purchase used books want them as cheap as possible.
They are a lower paying site. But some of the others have minimum $ before they will buy, and Declutrr is only like 10. Also the legos do not have to even be in a box. The price is per pound. They dont care if they match or anything. They do pay quickly, I dont have paypal, they will send a check. No problems so far. Used several times. They do what they say they will do.
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Congrats on publishing! Either way, honestly. If you’ve already got cases of them, it’s probably just easier to send one or two cases to Amazon and see how you do. Amazon also offers Kindle Direct Publishing and Create Space services for self-published authors, which are both totally cool. Sure, they take a big ol’ bite out of your profits, but there’s no cost of goods on your end except for marketing. KDP is all digital. And Create Space is print-on-demand.
These sites and several others like them are a compilation of thousands of book dealers' listings. They can give you a rough idea of typical market prices for most books in circulation. I won't go into specifics now, but in general, you'll need to match up the specific copyright dates and publisher for an accurate comparison. Also, condition can make a huge difference, not to mention the presence of a dust jacket. Read the descriptions carefully.
Try to find out what a particular book has sold for recently. Amazon doesn't display completed sales, but you can search eBay for closing prices on completed auctions. There are also other websites that may give an indication of market value, for example, Abe books, Alibris, and Book finder. The video below describes recent changes to Amazon's charging structure. These could affect the viability of small volume online booksellers.
Hello-Great article and tips. I want to buy and sell books on Amazon full time. However, I am quite discouraged about a lot of places not wanting us to use our scanners in their stores. Also, I have heard the Amazon seller fees have become so much that it’s hard to make a profit. Is this true? Can you please expound on this? I would greatly appreciate it!
They are a lower paying site. But some of the others have minimum $ before they will buy, and Declutrr is only like 10. Also the legos do not have to even be in a box. The price is per pound. They dont care if they match or anything. They do pay quickly, I dont have paypal, they will send a check. No problems so far. Used several times. They do what they say they will do.
Search by ISBN: The ISBN (International Standard Book Number) is a unique number located on the back of your book that identifies the particular title, author, and edition of a book. Some books have 10-digit ISBNs, others have 13 digits. Searching by ISBN ensures that you will be quoted the correct buyback prices on the exact book and edition you are selling.
We donate overstock inventory to nonprofit agencies around the world and strive to recycle what we can't donate. You may bring your merchandise to sell to any of our Neighborhood Stores (excludes Outlet locations). We are not able to make estimates or offers from a list; buyers must see the actual items. If you have any questions about merchandise you want to sell, please use the form at the bottom of this page.
If you find you enjoy selling books online and make a profit you will need to replenish stock in order to sell more. This is where experience and research will determine future success. Just because a book is old, does not mean it is valuable. The opposite may also be true. Some new books are sought after because their publishers miscalculated their popularity and so produced print runs that did not meet demand.
These sites and several others like them are a compilation of thousands of book dealers' listings. They can give you a rough idea of typical market prices for most books in circulation. I won't go into specifics now, but in general, you'll need to match up the specific copyright dates and publisher for an accurate comparison. Also, condition can make a huge difference, not to mention the presence of a dust jacket. Read the descriptions carefully.
Perspectives can change indeed. I hope they do but I doubt that they will. For the past 45 years I kept almost every issue of every magazine I've subscribed to and every book that I bought with the idea that, at some point, I will re-read them. Well, I haven't. There always were new magazine issues and new books to read. Once they were moved to the attic, it was "out of sight, out of mind." Then I came to the realization that no matter how much I enjoyed reading them and how informative they were, these books and magazines are outdated.
Scouting sites are an excellent tool if you want to find the best buyback price quotes across several sites with one click. BookScouter.com and BookFinder.com are two good ones to start. These websites show what different companies will offer you for a given book. But be advised these rates are constantly changing with the market. It would be wise to make your book-selling project a one-day mission.
Dynamic pricing software cross-referenced every active listing of a used, like-new, hardcover copy of Our Gang across online marketplaces like Amazon and Abebooks, then matched the lowest price. Last March, four months after it was listed, I bought the book for a penny, and Books Squared shipped it to my apartment in Toronto. This handsome volume is sitting proudly on my desk right now.
eBay.com. This is a good place for selling rare or collectible books — and even vinyl records. The eBay site fees are pretty complicated, but the basic structure is that your first 50 listings per month are free, and then you pay 30 cents per listing for any additional listings that month. The company offers a handy fee calculator. Another nice feature for people who don't want to go through much hassle is that eBay offers a selling "valet service." If you mail your stuff to the company, then it will sell the items for you. You can't sell books or CDs through this service, but this is an option if you have collectible vinyl. Based on the sale price of the item, the commission for this valet service is 20 to 40 percent.

There are some key differences between this self-publishing (which, by the way, doesn’t have the negative connotations it used to) and traditional publishing process. You won’t be dealing with printed books, for one. That eliminates the expense and hassle of actually creating books, storing them, and delivering them — and that may not even sell. It’s going to be all digital. These are ebooks, which can be read on devices like Amazon’s Kindle, on another tablet or smartphone, or even on a computer.

There are two main categories of second-hand books. The first and most common is that of a book which has been owned by someone else (yourself or another person) and is now being resold at a percentage of the original cover price. This category could include textbooks for students, popular fiction, or ordinary books which are being sold off following the death of their original owner.
You might also consider selling your textbooks on Half.com. Their fees are usually lower than Amazon’s and you also receive a small shipping credit. Selling on Half is a good option for books that other sites currently are not buying back or offering low rates. As with Amazon, you only get paid once somebody buys and you might find yourself in a pricing war if other college students list their books as well.

Here, enter the relevant details concerning the book’s condition, how much you wish to sell it for and which postage options you wish to use. Note that Amazon offers a fulfilment service for delivery of your goods, but this is really only an option for professional sellers. Your best option is to offer the fastest and most affordable shipping, although bear in mind the trade-off between these two qualities.
There are two main categories of second-hand books. The first and most common is that of a book which has been owned by someone else (yourself or another person) and is now being resold at a percentage of the original cover price. This category could include textbooks for students, popular fiction, or ordinary books which are being sold off following the death of their original owner.
Assuming you have located some comparable books on these sites, if the prices quoted are for the most part $15 to $20 or more, there's a good chance you may be able to realize $10 or more by listing your item on eBay. If the prices are lower than this, chances are you've got a dog. Another rule of thumb: in my experience, it simply isn't worth the trouble to list a book that sells for less than $10.
These sites and several others like them are a compilation of thousands of book dealers' listings. They can give you a rough idea of typical market prices for most books in circulation. I won't go into specifics now, but in general, you'll need to match up the specific copyright dates and publisher for an accurate comparison. Also, condition can make a huge difference, not to mention the presence of a dust jacket. Read the descriptions carefully.
Well it looks like plenty of people are responding to this, not sure if these guys have been doing this all along or not but, I found tons of treasures in Goodwill stores over the years, but not books. Now that Goodwill stopped putting treasures on the shelves and instead they list the stuff, I decided to slow down visiting them. Just looks like junkwill in there now. But after reading this page I went into Goodwill today to scan some books and there was this guy all over the books with a scanner and a cart just scanning– bam bam one after the other as fast as he could.
If you're okay with receiving gift cards instead of cash for your books, Amazon has an excellent book buyback program. They advertise that they pay up to 80% of the value of a book, and that could prove to be significantly more than what book re-sellers are currently paying. With all the things that Amazon sells, a gift card is almost as good as cash. It won't put gas in your car or pay your bills, but it'll buy just about anything else you need.

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Search by ISBN: The ISBN (International Standard Book Number) is a unique number located on the back of your book that identifies the particular title, author, and edition of a book. Some books have 10-digit ISBNs, others have 13 digits. Searching by ISBN ensures that you will be quoted the correct buyback prices on the exact book and edition you are selling.
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