Peter says, “The good news for new sellers is that no deep knowledge of books is required. A variety of paid apps allow booksellers to scan a barcode (with their phone's camera or a Bluetooth barcode scanner) and get instant results as to the book's value, sales rank, and more. So while it helps to have a knowledge of books, a new seller can defer completely to the data on their scanning app when making a buying decision.
From what I have understood from looking through Amazon and looking at BSR for the first time ( thanks 2 U) i ca see most of these books are between 300,000 and 10,000 BSR. I suppose they are all worth a sell but on average they sell for about £3. What can you suggest , looking at time limitations/ and end sale? Please advice the best way forwards, UK based thanks mate.
I’m new to the Amazon selling game. After some research I found buying and reselling textbooks an idea people agree on. However I also read (mostly on Amazon own seller central blog) that several books and textbooks in particular are increasingly becoming restricted items for small (and not so small) sellers, a policy that started about a year ago. Looks like it’s still possible to sell some, but restriction is increasing on the most demanded ones.

Right before we moved, I started shedding all the personal finance books I’d been sent over the years. The quickest way, though it won’t net the most money, is to trade them in for credit on Amazon. Just list them, pack them in a box or envelope, and send them on their merry way. For the more valuable titles, listing them for sale at the lowest price on Amazon meant it probably lasted a week before it was sold… but then you had to print each one individually. I got rid of probably 30-40 books that way and pocketed maybe a few hundred bucks?
This just seems not right that the book area which is usually no traffic hardly at all now suddenly has these book attackers scanning away. It really makes the other store customers just stay away until they leave. Can’t help to wonder if it is even ethical in a first come first serve environment like that, I mean this just started lately. I mean I felt like I had better not even dare to grab and check out a book that was within this guys two arms reach on this public shelf… it is intimidating to other potential book shoppers…Just walked away!
Our company makes it easy to sell your textbooks from the convenience of your home and at top rates to boot. Whether you’ve been in the book industry for years or are just trying to sell old textbooks in your closet, our friendly staff is ready and willing to answer your questions, provide support and make the selling process a breeze. Contact our staff today, or review our textbook buyback FAQ page for additional information.
The only trouble is the low quality of that yield. Mike Ward, owner of Thrift Books – the largest of the used book sellers in the US and parent company to a number of subsidiaries, including Books Squared – likens the book collection process to “a very large salvage operation”. His network of warehouses is bringing in, on average, 15 semi-trailer trucks full of used books every day, but less than 20% of those books arrive in saleable condition.
2.) Scan Scan Scan. I went through my house (literally every nook and cranny) and found items to scan. If the app told me it was worth more than $0.25, I put it in a box I had set aside. Why only $0.25 you may ask? I was going to donate most of these items anyways, so anything over a quarter I thought was worth my time. They give you the amount that they will pay you right on the app as you can, that way you know what the grand total of your shipment will make you in cash.
Dynamic pricing software cross-referenced every active listing of a used, like-new, hardcover copy of Our Gang across online marketplaces like Amazon and Abebooks, then matched the lowest price. Last March, four months after it was listed, I bought the book for a penny, and Books Squared shipped it to my apartment in Toronto. This handsome volume is sitting proudly on my desk right now.
Christian Cawley is a Deputy Editor at MakeUseOf, covering security, Linux, DIY and programming, with extensive experience in desktop and software support. Christian is a regular contributor to Linux User & Developer magazine, as well as specials including Raspberry Pi for Beginners, and Raspberry Pi for Kids. He's a Raspberry Pi tinkerer, Android user, podcaster and foodie.
These sites and several others like them are a compilation of thousands of book dealers' listings. They can give you a rough idea of typical market prices for most books in circulation. I won't go into specifics now, but in general, you'll need to match up the specific copyright dates and publisher for an accurate comparison. Also, condition can make a huge difference, not to mention the presence of a dust jacket. Read the descriptions carefully.
For rare and collectable books, use a traceable delivery method in case the package gets lost in transit. Remember to include the cost of your bubble mailer and Scotch tape in your shipping costs. Depending on the size of the book, these can be as much as the postal charge itself. It is worth using good quality packing materials. These will ensure that your buyer receives their book(s) undamaged by any rough handling in transit. Happy customers mean repeat purchases and recommendations to their friends.
Scouting sites are an excellent tool if you want to find the best buyback price quotes across several sites with one click. BookScouter.com and BookFinder.com are two good ones to start. These websites show what different companies will offer you for a given book. But be advised these rates are constantly changing with the market. It would be wise to make your book-selling project a one-day mission.

Comic books and graphic novels (if you haven’t switched from physical copies to PDFs 4 Android Apps For Reading Your PDF Comic Book Collection 4 Android Apps For Reading Your PDF Comic Book Collection Do you have comics saved in PDF format, or are you just looking for a good comic book reader? Check out these amazing Android apps. Read More ) can do particularly well too, especially when there is a movie adaptation or other related media that might be currently popular.


When you sell a product on Ebay, it’s you AND your listing that’s competing. And even if you’re the cheapest or best entry, you might not appear on the first page of search results (not unless the shopper uses the filters, of course). And despite the fact that my comic books were priced aggressively, the listings whose sellers had been selling on Ebay longer (sometimes for a decade or more) were given precedence.

As you can see the profit margins aren't huge on a single book, because there are several other Ebayers playing this trade-in game. However, if you can average a $5 profit margin on each book, you only need to buy 5 books everyday to pocket an extra $750 dollars each month! Considering there are over a million textbook auctions on Ebay right now, it shouldn't be too hard to find 5 books a day to resell.
“Just wanted to let you know that I had a great experience selling through your company. I had some textbooks that I no longer needed and were in good shape. I got the exact price for them that I was quoted. There was no hassle with the Fedex shipping. I just sent the textbooks in the mail yesterday and received notification today that the money was already in my PayPal account. Fantastic service! Thank you so much.” - Kaity C.
Sam, if these are rare and collectibles, you may want to look into selling them to collectors or even art galleries. Craigslist could be a good option for finding interested parties. Other than that, you could always try one of the sites mentioned above. But I wouldn’t send in all the books at once. I would send in a sample, then see if they have any deals for you since you have a big volume.
En español | In his book, The Library at Night, author Alberto Manguel writes: "Ultimately, the number of books always exceeds the space they are granted." If you're a lover and collector of books or music, you know the truth behind those words. If you're looking to free up some shelf space or maybe generate some extra cash, here are the best ways to part with unwanted books, CDs and records.

Here, enter the relevant details concerning the book’s condition, how much you wish to sell it for and which postage options you wish to use. Note that Amazon offers a fulfilment service for delivery of your goods, but this is really only an option for professional sellers. Your best option is to offer the fastest and most affordable shipping, although bear in mind the trade-off between these two qualities.


Books are heavy items. Most buyers will expect to have their books delivered to them and you need to consider shipping and postage costs when you price your wares. Some websites have standard postal charge (e.g. Amazon). This may not cover the actual shipping costs. So make sure the book sale price is sufficient to cover your outgoings and make a profit for you. Some websites (e.g. eBay) allow you to determine what (if anything) you want to charge for shipping on top of the sale price. You may also be able to specify different costs for tracked delivery compared to standard delivery.
You might also consider selling your textbooks on Half.com. Their fees are usually lower than Amazon’s and you also receive a small shipping credit. Selling on Half is a good option for books that other sites currently are not buying back or offering low rates. As with Amazon, you only get paid once somebody buys and you might find yourself in a pricing war if other college students list their books as well.
Charity is a big part of the used book market. Martin Mullen, head of UK acquisitions at Better World Books, tells me that the public good is at the core of the company’s business: to date they have donated more than 50m books, raised millions of dollars for literacy initiatives, and reused or recycled more than 153m books – books that for the most part would be decomposing right now had they not saved them.

Interesting read! I’ve been looking at FBA but for private label, hadn’t considered physical books. I’ve been on the other side of Amazon selling for years, digital books, being one of the longest online independent e-publishers around, but in recent years there has been a big change in how Amazon handles that side. My question for physical books is, you say you just put them in a box and ship to a fulfillment center. Does a listing need to be included in the box with title and ISBN or something for identifier for the fulfillment center? Wondering the prep involved. Books are heavy also, does shipping costs of boxes of books become high?
Try to find out what a particular book has sold for recently. Amazon doesn't display completed sales, but you can search eBay for closing prices on completed auctions. There are also other websites that may give an indication of market value, for example, Abe books, Alibris, and Book finder. The video below describes recent changes to Amazon's charging structure. These could affect the viability of small volume online booksellers.
Instead of scanning each and every book at a book sale, I’d just make offers on the entire lot. This worked especially well at yard sales, estate sales, and even book store closings. By being indiscriminate, it meant that I could get the price per book way down (usually less than $0.25 per book), but also meant that I was left with a lot of duds. With good purchases, I’d usually have 3 “donate” books for every 1 book I listed. So, effectively, my inventory cost $1.00 per item.
Some links on this page are affiliate links, meaning that if you purchase a product through them I receive a small commission which helps me provide this information to you for free, plus support my family. My integrity and your satisfaction are very important to me so I only recommend products I would purchase myself, and that I believe would benefit you. To learn more please see my disclosure statement.
There are a number of good angles that you can go with here. For example, there is often high demand for textbooks, but mostly for current editions and ones that colleges are actively using. Textbooks also tend to be fairly expensive, so the profit margin is high if you can find them at a low price. Nuances like that can make a difference between a $2 profit and a $20 one.
You just need to create an outline for the book to follow, set a schedule for when you’re going to write (if it’s original work) or when you’re going to work on it, how you will market the book and when each task needs to be done, and set a goal publication date when it will be offered on sale. It’s a matter of setting aside time each day. You can’t just work on this when you “feel” like it… otherwise, it’ll never get done.
In general, mercifully, Ward says Thrift Books “errs on the side of keeping more books than we need to”, and his software’s algorithms single out rare titles for protection even if market demand doesn’t warrant it. What they can’t sell, they recycle. That proves to be quite a few books: last year alone they recycled 130m pounds. What remains after a bookseller’s vetting process stocks their virtual storefronts.
Selling used books online also means that you have to maintain a physical stock of the books, while also shipping those out as sales are made. There is a fair amount of logistics involved in doing this, along with the physical space to store the books. Sure, if you score a few rarities you can put them in your closet. If you start buying in bulk, you may need a storage unit.
Though this may seem woefully unreliable at first, the most important tool you have for identifying a saleable book is your nose, or instinct. Wherever you are - at a sale, in a thrift shop, a used bookstore, etc., - trust your nose. If you see something that catches your eye, it may well catch the eye of a buyer as well. A good rule of thumb is: if you pick up a book, look at it, put it back, and then at some later point pick it up again, it's time to buy it. It's caught your eye twice. There's something about it, perhaps as yet indefinable, that could produce a sale.
I check the selling price of Go Set a Watchman, a hardcover book I paid full price for, but one that I honestly never want to see on my shelves again. BookScouter says that one (just one) of the websites they scan will buy my copy for $0.12. Harsh. I didn’t like it either, guys, but that’s like $0.25 less than what it probably cost to print the dang book. My paperback of To Kill a Mockingbird, on the other hand, will go to three different sites for as much as $0.75.
×