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Yeah, some places definitely aren’t crazy about scanners. Personally, I never did it with the scanner method. As far as the fees go, I recommend looking for stuff that can cover your fees which are 15% of the price, roughly $3-4 for FBA, and $1.80 for media. Textbooks and niche books like comic books and stuff like that are pretty good for getting past the fees.

Interesting read! I’ve been looking at FBA but for private label, hadn’t considered physical books. I’ve been on the other side of Amazon selling for years, digital books, being one of the longest online independent e-publishers around, but in recent years there has been a big change in how Amazon handles that side. My question for physical books is, you say you just put them in a box and ship to a fulfillment center. Does a listing need to be included in the box with title and ISBN or something for identifier for the fulfillment center? Wondering the prep involved. Books are heavy also, does shipping costs of boxes of books become high?
It's a bit of a horrifying experience the first time you walk into a college bookstore. I remember the first time saying to myself, “You want a $145 for that?” To say I felt ripped off is an understatement, which is why this side hustle I'm about to share is all the more exciting; Bookscouter is not a rip off, in fact, it's a totally legitimate company.

4. Over the years, I have used such credit to purchase an acoustic guitar for my older son, rent DVD’s and buy games. But, there is one other benefit of which most people are unaware. If there is nothing in the store you’d like to purchase, you can use the Hastings card to purchase gift cards for other businesses. For years, we paid for our AT&T go phone by purchasing phone card minutes at Hastings. I have also used such credit to purchase gift cards for Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse, Chili’s, On the Border, Macaroni Grill, Cracker Barrel and Sonic. Beyond food, Hastings also has gift cards for movie theaters, Footlocker, Champs and Itunes. Over the years, I have repeatedly bought a few dollars worth of books and traded them in for food, phone minutes, shoes and gifts.


Take a book, plug in the ISBN number to a couple of scouting sites, and label the book with the best prices on a sticky note before you make your final counts. These scouting sites might direct you to sell your books with dealers, such as ValoreBooks, TextbookRush, and Chegg. Most of these sites are hit or miss depending on the book. Also, scouting sites can be unreliable, so check the actual buyer sites to confirm their rates.
* Half Price Books is your source for buying and selling secondhand books, music, movies and games. However, not all HPB stores buy electronic devices such as mobile phones, gaming consoles, and tablets. Please note that Outlet locations do not buy from the public. Please visit our other retail locations to sell your stuff. Thanks for shopping and selling at HPB.
I am about to retire, and I have about 6 thousand books in my personal library. Many of these are professional books: religious topics, Bible commentaries, and so on. I had thought to sell a lot of these on Amazon, but I really can’t understand how people can make a profit for those book that are listed at one cent, or four or five dollars. As I have looked up some of my books, I find that some of them might go for 10=15 dollars, so that might be worth it. But I figured I would do the fulfillment myself. What I have are books likely to be found by people looking for that specific title or topic. I have bought many books through Amazon for a penny, with the $3.99 shipping added. Is that enough to turn a profit?

I am thrilled with your information and the help of your commenters. They all provided lots of help to sell my book collection. I have alot of research books, mainly Native American/Cherokee books and Vampire books and have decided to stop carting them around even though I love them. I am excited with the information provided here and will check them out.
They pay the most for more recent publications and those that are in high demand, but will buy all your books, not making you haul some of them away that don't meet their standards. But the ones that they decide not to sell won't of course, give you much if any cash and they'll donate them or recycle them. But you don't have to deal with disposal for any not worth anything!

There comes a time in every reader’s life where they have to accept some hard truths: that not every book they’ve read is one they should treasure forever; that they don’t need three different copies of their favorite classic, even if it keeps being re-released with cooler covers; that decorating in towering stacks of books might not be the healthiest choice, unless they want to start wearing helmets around the house. When you’ve come to this point, you will want to clean out your collection. And, that may mean it’s time to sell books (*gasp!*).

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