Unlike many other websites that sell college textbooks, CollegeBooksDirect.com only sells textbooks we currently have in stock. This means no false promises about fulfilling your order, unauthorized substitution of new for used or late notices informing you your order will be shipped partially filled. The title(s) you order on our site is exactly what you'll receive. No surprises or switches. 93% of orders are processed in one business day. 100% of orders are processed with in two business days. This means if you place an order by 2 P.M. CST, it will ship today!
Find out how much the book in question is selling for – When you come across a potential book to sell, hop over to Amazon and see how much it is currently going for. (BookScouter can help with this process as well and also tell you where you can get the biggest bang for your buck.) Keep in mind, you will need to pay Amazon's fees. That's usually around $2.35 + 15% of the sale price. For that reason, don't sell things that will lose you money.
Be honest about the condition of the book. If there are damaged corners or missing pages, say so. If someone has written in or highlighted huge portions of the book, make that known. If the book has remainder marks (an indication they've been returned to the publisher), mention that, too. Fudging on the condition won't get you more money. When the buyer receives your book and finds it lacking, they'll adjust their offer down, and may even reject your book completely.
One of the first questions that arises when contemplating selling books online is, how do I know which books will sell? A quick glance at eBay book listings might discourage you from selling them at all because, sadly, the majority of books offered for auction ultimately receive no bids whatsoever. This is why it's crucial that you do your homework before spending the time and energy to list a book for auction.
Try to find out what a particular book has sold for recently. Amazon doesn't display completed sales, but you can search eBay for closing prices on completed auctions. There are also other websites that may give an indication of market value, for example, Abe books, Alibris, and Book finder. The video below describes recent changes to Amazon's charging structure. These could affect the viability of small volume online booksellers.
I am about to retire, and I have about 6 thousand books in my personal library. Many of these are professional books: religious topics, Bible commentaries, and so on. I had thought to sell a lot of these on Amazon, but I really can’t understand how people can make a profit for those book that are listed at one cent, or four or five dollars. As I have looked up some of my books, I find that some of them might go for 10=15 dollars, so that might be worth it. But I figured I would do the fulfillment myself. What I have are books likely to be found by people looking for that specific title or topic. I have bought many books through Amazon for a penny, with the $3.99 shipping added. Is that enough to turn a profit?
Here is a screenshot of an auction that just closed for the book “Fundamentals of Physical Geography.” It was sold for $52.50 (plus $3.99 for shipping) giving the buyer a total cost of $56.49. Using the tool at BookScouter, I see that Moola4Books.com is paying $61.25 for the same book and they will cover the cost of shipping if I send it to them, giving me a profit margin of $4.76.

The first is through their trade-in program. For the trade-in program, you search your book edition, find the ISBN (the 13 digit code typically on the back or on the copyright page), and check if Amazon will offer you money for your book. Fill out a brief questionnaire about the condition of your book, and then Amazon will give you a shipping label. Once they’ve received the book, they’ll give you an Amazon credit.
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