They are a lower paying site. But some of the others have minimum $ before they will buy, and Declutrr is only like 10. Also the legos do not have to even be in a box. The price is per pound. They dont care if they match or anything. They do pay quickly, I dont have paypal, they will send a check. No problems so far. Used several times. They do what they say they will do.


Scouting sites are an excellent tool if you want to find the best buyback price quotes across several sites with one click. BookScouter.com and BookFinder.com are two good ones to start. These websites show what different companies will offer you for a given book. But be advised these rates are constantly changing with the market. It would be wise to make your book-selling project a one-day mission.

Just because you are self-publishing doesn’t mean you want it to like an amateur did it. Hire a graphic designer on a site like Fiverr.com to create a good-looking cover based on your direction and input for not much money. They can also lay out the interior pages too. Just because your book is self-published doesn't mean it has to look and feel that way.
Thank you for the helpful tips. My husband passed away last year and he was an avid reader. I have a few hundred books to sell with a mixture of paperback and hardback. They are in great condition except he always threw away the dust covers as he hated them. He mostly read sci fi, alternate history, and military related titles. Do you think that selling them on Amazon and using the FBA method would be my best bet?

We'll pay cash for your books, textbooks, music, movies, mobile phones, tablets, games, gaming consoles, e-readers and more(excluding Outlet locations)!* You can spend the cash in the store or take it home with you. We pay the most for recent bestsellers and collectibles, but we're also interested in good books, music, and movies of all kinds. The primary factors we consider when buying used merchandise of any kind are: 1.) condition 2.) supply and demand.
For truly valuable and rare books, online booksellers are not the best place to find reliable information on achievable prices. These websites show the price a seller would like to achieve, not what a buyer is actually willing to pay. The seller has nothing to lose by asking a totally unachievable price in the hope of catching someone with more money than sense.
Instead of scanning each and every book at a book sale, I’d just make offers on the entire lot. This worked especially well at yard sales, estate sales, and even book store closings. By being indiscriminate, it meant that I could get the price per book way down (usually less than $0.25 per book), but also meant that I was left with a lot of duds. With good purchases, I’d usually have 3 “donate” books for every 1 book I listed. So, effectively, my inventory cost $1.00 per item.
The big benefit to working through Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing, even though they charge you a commission on your sales, is their reach. Around 89 million Americans are said to be active ebook readers. That’s your potential audience, all those people visiting this site and browsing for a new book. It could be your book they find when doing a search on a related keyword. In fact, 38 percent of daily sales of ebooks on Amazon go to self-published titles.
eBay.com. This is a good place for selling rare or collectible books — and even vinyl records. The eBay site fees are pretty complicated, but the basic structure is that your first 50 listings per month are free, and then you pay 30 cents per listing for any additional listings that month. The company offers a handy fee calculator. Another nice feature for people who don't want to go through much hassle is that eBay offers a selling "valet service." If you mail your stuff to the company, then it will sell the items for you. You can't sell books or CDs through this service, but this is an option if you have collectible vinyl. Based on the sale price of the item, the commission for this valet service is 20 to 40 percent.
When I click the link to make an “Individual Seller” account and it gets to my Bank info, It says that I am making a “Professional Account” and only gives me that option, and says that once I put in my card info, that they will bill me for the $39.99. I never even wanted any of that. I wanted the Individual and free option. So I called customer service 3 times and all times, they said that they are in the middle of some stuff and that my only option is to select the “Professional Seller” account and to pay the $39.99 and that they would immediately refund me the money and downgrade my account to Individual from there. I don’t know, that seems fishy to me. They said that a lot of people have been having this same question to them lately and that is what they have been telling them to do. Have you encountered this? I saw someone in your comments just 20 days ago say that he was able to make an individual account. Not fair! Please shed some light on this if you will.
I am about to retire, and I have about 6 thousand books in my personal library. Many of these are professional books: religious topics, Bible commentaries, and so on. I had thought to sell a lot of these on Amazon, but I really can’t understand how people can make a profit for those book that are listed at one cent, or four or five dollars. As I have looked up some of my books, I find that some of them might go for 10=15 dollars, so that might be worth it. But I figured I would do the fulfillment myself. What I have are books likely to be found by people looking for that specific title or topic. I have bought many books through Amazon for a penny, with the $3.99 shipping added. Is that enough to turn a profit?

There are a number of good angles that you can go with here. For example, there is often high demand for textbooks, but mostly for current editions and ones that colleges are actively using. Textbooks also tend to be fairly expensive, so the profit margin is high if you can find them at a low price. Nuances like that can make a difference between a $2 profit and a $20 one.
If you find you enjoy selling books online and make a profit you will need to replenish stock in order to sell more. This is where experience and research will determine future success. Just because a book is old, does not mean it is valuable. The opposite may also be true. Some new books are sought after because their publishers miscalculated their popularity and so produced print runs that did not meet demand.

The way you describe your books online is crucially important to a successful sale. Photographs as well as words can help a potential buyer understand exactly what you are selling. They need to know not just the title and date of publication of the book, but also a detailed description of its condition. This is especially important for higher value items.
What's up ladies and dudes! Great to finally meet you, and I hope you enjoyed this post. My name is Nathaniell and I'm the owner of One More Cup of Coffee. I started my first online business in 2010 promoting computer software and now I help newbies start their own businesses. Sign up for my #1 recommended training course and learn how to start your business for FREE!
I've written previously about how I sell used books online for extra money, but that involves going to garage sales every weekend and sweating the summer heat. Today I'm going to show you how to buy textbooks online at sites like Ebay, and then how to resell them online for a profit at places like BookScouter.com. Consider it my sweet revenge against the bookstores that overcharged me as a college student. 🙂
2. Look around. When taking your books to Hastings or other stores, the associate will usually ask for a valid I.D. and then proceed to scan what you have brought in. Should a book not be in their system or should they already have an adequate supply, then they may reject it. But take heart, just because one Hastings does not need a particular book that does not mean another won’t. If you have found a supplier for newer books, most will probably sell.
Sam, if these are rare and collectibles, you may want to look into selling them to collectors or even art galleries. Craigslist could be a good option for finding interested parties. Other than that, you could always try one of the sites mentioned above. But I wouldn’t send in all the books at once. I would send in a sample, then see if they have any deals for you since you have a big volume.
“Just wanted to let you know that I had a great experience selling through your company. I had some textbooks that I no longer needed and were in good shape. I got the exact price for them that I was quoted. There was no hassle with the Fedex shipping. I just sent the textbooks in the mail yesterday and received notification today that the money was already in my PayPal account. Fantastic service! Thank you so much.” - Kaity C.
Find out how much the book in question is selling for – When you come across a potential book to sell, hop over to Amazon and see how much it is currently going for. (BookScouter can help with this process as well and also tell you where you can get the biggest bang for your buck.) Keep in mind, you will need to pay Amazon's fees. That's usually around $2.35 + 15% of the sale price. For that reason, don't sell things that will lose you money.

Thanks for the information.I’m selling books part-time on Amazon.When it comes to sourcing book it really needs some effort and time.I source books which have a good sales rank and sales history for that I have to understand the Keepa graph which is really difficult but last month I found a free statistical search engine for books http://www.amstick.com . It easy to understand and saves a lot of time.Hope this will help books sellers like me.
Amazon.com. Amazon charges individual sellers 99 cents per item that sells, so it only makes sense to list items on which you'll make a worthwhile profit. You only can sell items that are already currently listed on Amazon, which, of course, includes tons of book titles, CDs and some vinyl — but may not include everything in the collection you're looking to unload.
Well it looks like plenty of people are responding to this, not sure if these guys have been doing this all along or not but, I found tons of treasures in Goodwill stores over the years, but not books. Now that Goodwill stopped putting treasures on the shelves and instead they list the stuff, I decided to slow down visiting them. Just looks like junkwill in there now. But after reading this page I went into Goodwill today to scan some books and there was this guy all over the books with a scanner and a cart just scanning– bam bam one after the other as fast as he could.

“The initial reason was that I owned a lot – and was continually acquiring more. They were all over the house, and I figured it made sense to start unloading some of those I had already read before I had to turn my kitchen into a library, too! I didn't start doing it seriously, however, until I made the leap to full-time author last year. I knew I wasn't going to be making money for a while, and I liked the idea of having a part-time gig I could do on my own schedule.”


Basically, those that use the scanning method go to sales where books are priced dirt cheap (usually under $1.00) and scan each and every bar code with their cell phone or portable scanner. An app on their phone cross reference’s the book’s BSR as well as the book’s lowest sales price and lets the seller know whether or not the book is worth purchasing. Typically, a Scanner will carry a box, shopping cart, or many reusable shopping bags to lug their goods around.

Powell’s: They buy mostly mainstream books, not the technical or educational types. As mentioned above, they do have a very strict acceptance policy. The only writing they will accept is a name written in the front of the book – not even “to my favorite daughter, hope you enjoy this book as much as I did, love mom.” Absolutely no highlighting or underlining.
>> Moon Palace Jamaica Review – Great Family Vacation Resort! >> How cooking with an ALDI Meal Plan will Save you Thousands per year! >> How to Budget your bills using a Budget Planner >> How to Easily Sell Used Books Online {Electronics and Video Games Too!} >> When Your Budget Doesn’t Work (and What You Can Do About It) >> SmartyPig Review: What it is and How it works >> How to Save Money on Back to School Shopping >> My Weekly Shopping Trip and Meal Plan – July 9th
Supposedly, selling prime gives you a pretty big bump in conversions since people will get the books sooner. The textbook method, also called Zen Arbitrage by some, is pretty good since a lot of students want textbooks fast and are willing to pay the difference. Lately, I’ve been doing OA with a niche market, buying wholesale lots on Ebay and flipping them on Amazon (although I’ve been doing those from home).
Auction sites online and auction houses are also worth checking out for second-hand books. House clearances can be a good source of book collections. Often relatives of the deceased just want to clear the house with as little hassle as possible. If you have transport you may be able to be paid by executors to take hundreds of books away for dumping, and retrieve a couple of gems from the dross.
Right before we moved, I started shedding all the personal finance books I’d been sent over the years. The quickest way, though it won’t net the most money, is to trade them in for credit on Amazon. Just list them, pack them in a box or envelope, and send them on their merry way. For the more valuable titles, listing them for sale at the lowest price on Amazon meant it probably lasted a week before it was sold… but then you had to print each one individually. I got rid of probably 30-40 books that way and pocketed maybe a few hundred bucks?

Thank you for the helpful tips. My husband passed away last year and he was an avid reader. I have a few hundred books to sell with a mixture of paperback and hardback. They are in great condition except he always threw away the dust covers as he hated them. He mostly read sci fi, alternate history, and military related titles. Do you think that selling them on Amazon and using the FBA method would be my best bet?
All things considered, this is the best method of selling books, which I no longer recommend, because the costs for doing business are too high to make a profit. So you run around burning up a tank of gas, trying to source a couple good books, and yeah, they have to be in very good/ to excellent condition, or they aren’t competitive. Then those fees will kill you! With the FBA program, you also have to pay to ship the books to Amazon, and those costs have also gone up. Yes, books are heavy, and
The only trouble is the low quality of that yield. Mike Ward, owner of Thrift Books – the largest of the used book sellers in the US and parent company to a number of subsidiaries, including Books Squared – likens the book collection process to “a very large salvage operation”. His network of warehouses is bringing in, on average, 15 semi-trailer trucks full of used books every day, but less than 20% of those books arrive in saleable condition.
Fulfilled-by-Amazon (FBA) is a program that Amazon offers its sellers which allows them to ship their inventory directly to one of their giant, million-acre fulfillment centers (FC). From there, Amazon stores your products/books for you. When a sale goes through, they pick, pack, and ship your product. Plus, they deal with customer service issues like returns, complaints, etc. on your behalf.
You might also consider selling your textbooks on Half.com. Their fees are usually lower than Amazon’s and you also receive a small shipping credit. Selling on Half is a good option for books that other sites currently are not buying back or offering low rates. As with Amazon, you only get paid once somebody buys and you might find yourself in a pricing war if other college students list their books as well.
Our company makes it easy to sell your textbooks from the convenience of your home and at top rates to boot. Whether you’ve been in the book industry for years or are just trying to sell old textbooks in your closet, our friendly staff is ready and willing to answer your questions, provide support and make the selling process a breeze. Contact our staff today, or review our textbook buyback FAQ page for additional information.
Thank you for the helpful tips. My husband passed away last year and he was an avid reader. I have a few hundred books to sell with a mixture of paperback and hardback. They are in great condition except he always threw away the dust covers as he hated them. He mostly read sci fi, alternate history, and military related titles. Do you think that selling them on Amazon and using the FBA method would be my best bet?
You might check other bookstores to see if any of them have a similar program. One tactic I have used is to take a box of books with me when we drive out of town. The titles were ones that my local Hastings didn’t need, mainly because of their present inventory, but I could then sell to other Hastings in other cities. So I have taken a box of books when we have gone on vacation, visited relatives, etc.
Be honest about the condition of the book. If there are damaged corners or missing pages, say so. If someone has written in or highlighted huge portions of the book, make that known. If the book has remainder marks (an indication they've been returned to the publisher), mention that, too. Fudging on the condition won't get you more money. When the buyer receives your book and finds it lacking, they'll adjust their offer down, and may even reject your book completely.
Self-published authors have had big success in recent years. Take Hugh Howey, who sold a series of science fiction books through Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing. At one point, he was selling 20,000 — 30,000 copies a month, which generated $150,000 in income monthly. Amanda Hocking, who writes “paranormal romance” and fantasy novels, has sold well more than a million books on Amazon, generating over $2 million in sales. That's proof that you can make money self-publishing on Amazon.
Also, great advice on the obscure titles (I can see from your blog that you do indeed sell some obscure stuff :). It seems to work the same way for niche websites. The more obscure or “odd” the niche, the better my websites tend to do. People with unique interests are willing to pay a little more for the information they want. Thanks for sharing your advice, and if I decide to pursue this, I will let you know!
×